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Dating app Badoo and ride-hailing app Lyft were among other companies "whitelisted" for access to data about users' friends, the documents showed.

Facebook Inc let some companies, including Netflix and Airbnb, access users' lists of friends after it cut off that data for most other apps around 2015, according to documents released on Wednesday by a British lawmaker investigating fake news and social media.

The document, part of a larger 250-page parliamentary trove, shows what appears to be a copied-and-pasted recap of an internal chat conversation between various Facebook staffers and Kwon, who was then the company's deputy chief privacy officer and is now working as a product management director, according to his LinkedIn profile.

"Facebook have clearly entered into whitelisting agreements with certain companies, which meant that after the platform changes in 2014/15 they maintained full access to friends Data", Collins wrote in the report.

Zuckerberg's response, according to the email, was to "go for it". The statement adds, "The facts are clear: we've never sold people's data".

When news of this was released to the public, Facebook said it did not collect any call logs without permission and that those who participated knew and opted in.

The U.K. committee seized the documents from app developer Six4Three, maker of a now-defunct bikini-picture search app. Six4Three acquired the files as part of a USA lawsuit that accuses Facebook of deceptive, anti-competitive business practices.

Facebook had objected to their release.

Don't forget: It's all about apps hosted on Facebook's platform and their access to friends' data, an especially important topic in the light of the Cambridge Analytica scandal earlier this year.

The documents contain details of how Facebook specifically dealt with third party app makers.

Misuse of Facebook user data by Cambridge Analytica, a political consulting firm, along with another data breach this year and revelations about Facebook's lobbying tactics have heightened government scrutiny globally on the company's privacy and content moderation practices. Rather than letting devs pay a one time fee to fetch data, we could effectively do this by mandating that devs must keep data fresh and update their data each month for anything they call.

-Facebook used Onavo (an Israeli analytics company it bought in 2013) to check customers' usage of mobile apps without their knowledge. This information was used to suss out potential companies to acquire.

The committee's seizure of the documents, which were under seal by a court in the United States, came after the CEO of Six4Three, Theodore Kramer, was threatened with arrest while on a business trip to London if he didn't hand over the material.

"These developers do not want to participate in the ecosystem we have created, but rather build their own ecosystem at the expense of our users, other developers and, of course, us". The idea of tying access to this data to the developer's relationship with Facebook is a recurring feature throughout the documents.

Kramer was ordered by a judge on Friday to surrender his laptop to a forensic expert after admitting he turned over the documents to the British lawmakers, in violation of a USA court order.

"To mitigate any bad PR, Facebook planned to make it as hard as possible for users to know that this was one of the underlying features of the upgrade of their app", the summary said.


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